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Where does the Citric Acid Cycle (Krebs Cycle) Take Place?

Cictric Acid Cycle molecules

The Citric Acid Cycle is the second stage of cellular respiration. Without this metabolic process most organisms on Earth would not be able to produce energy to survive. Although this process is nearly identical in all organisms from bacteria to animals,  the Citric Acid Cycle takes place in the the cyotsol of the prokaryotic cells. However,  the Citric Acid cycle takes place in the  mitochondrial matrix of Eukaryotes?

 

Why do they occur in different locations?

During cell respiration, the Citric Acid Cycle can only take place after Acetyl-CoA is generated from Glycolysis. As you can see from the image below, Prokaryotes do not have organelles or membrane enclosed sacs to separate functions, so the Citric Acid Cycle must occur in the cytosol. In Eukaryotes energy production is carried out in the mitochondria  as a separate function from the rest of the cell.

Prokaryotes Vs Eukaryotes

 

Conclusion

  • The Citric Acid Cycle is the second stage of cellular respiration
  • Citric Acid Cycle takes place in the cytosol of prokaryotes
  • Citric Acid Cycle takes place in the mitochondria of eukaryotes
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